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In-Office Procedures

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Intravitreal Injection

This procedure is used to deliver a small amount of medicine in the middle part of the eye that directly is absorbed by the retina. The technician will numb (anesthetize) the white part of the eye with topical eye drops and antiseptic. Your Doctor will then use a small sterile needle to deliver the medicine. There is typically no pain and the entire procedure takes only a few minutes. Following the procedure, you may experience some tearing and discomfort for a few days which can be treated with over-the-counter artificial tears.

Laser or Cryotherapy for Retinal Tear

During this procedure, your doctor will use a laser or cryotherapy (freezing probe) to create a small scar in the retina to seal the torn retina. The treatment is localized to only the area of the torn retina, and does not damage the other parts of the retina. The procedure typically takes 10-15 minutes in the office.

Focal Laser and Panretinal Photocoagulation for Diabetic Retinopathy

During this procedure, your doctor will use a pinpoint laser to treat swelling in the retina (macular edema) or bleeding (vitreous hemorrhage). The procedure typically takes 15-20 minutes in the office.

Pneumatic Retinopexy for Retinal Detachment

During this procedure, your doctor will use a microscopic freezing probe (cryotherapy) to seal the area of the torn retina. The Doctor will then inject a small gas bubble into the middle of the eye to re-attach the retina. The gas bubble pushes and holds the retina into the proper position. Following the procedure, you will be instructed to maintain your head in a certain position to allow the Retina to heal for approximately 5-7 days. The gas bubble will gradually go away on its own over the course of 2 to 8 weeks. While the bubble is in your eye, you are not permitted to do any air travel, as that may cause the bubble to expand and damage your eye.